Jason Lichti

exploring the sacred space of family and work through the experience of a father, son, partner, and counselor

In the last analysis, the Bible is biased; it takes the side of the rejected ones, the abandoned ones, the barren women, and the ones who have been excluded, tortured, and kept outside. This is all summed up in Jesus’ own ministry: He clearly prefers, heals, and includes the foreigner, the non-Jew, the handicapped, and the sinner—without rejecting the people of power, but very clearly critiquing them.

—Richard Rohr

The Bible affirms law, authority, and tradition, as most writings in most of history have done, but then it also does something much more: it strongly affirms reform, change, and the voiceless, starting with the Exodus event itself. This is what makes the Bible a truly revolutionary and inspired book. It affirms the necessity of authority and continuity in a culture (tradition), but against the usual pattern it also affirms the currents of change, reform, the poor, the outsider, and justice for the marginalized groups—starting with the enslaved Jewish people themselves.

—Richard Rohr

Strength to Love

Strength to Love

Spirituality is about the ability to incorporate other beings in your plans, in what you’re doing, or saying, in your day-to-day job. Its keeping in mind, ‘My actions create actions that other people have to deal with. And my best nature elevates their nature.’

—Phil Jackson

Life can be found only in the present moment. The past is gone, and the future is not yet here, and if we do not go back to ourselves in the present moment, we cannot be in touch with life.

— Thich Nhat Hanh

: “Most of us … spend so much time bouncing back and forth between thoughts of the past, and of the future, that we lose touch of what’s happening right here, right now. And that prevents us from appreciating the deep mystery of being alive.”

—Phil Jackson

The great lesson from the true mystics … [is] that the sacred is in the ordinary, that it is to be found in one’s daily life, in one’s neighbors, friends, and family, in one’s backyard.

—Abraham H. Maslow

To tap into the sacred in work as well as in life, it’s essential to create order out of chaos…And that takes discipline, a healthy balance between work and play, and nourishment of mind, body, and spirit within the context of community.

—Phil Jackson

Work is holy, sacred, and uplifting when it springs from who we are, when it bears a relationship to our unfolding journey.

—Wayne Teasdale