Jason Lichti

exploring the sacred space of family and work through the experience of a father, son, partner, and counselor

Strike while the iron is cold

Just read this chapter from “The Gift of Therapy” by Irvin Yalom. Finding that is really appropriate to wait till the moment has past before processing some personality traits.  I am too quick to jump into the heat of a situation and try to fix it so that the person doesn’t feel any discomfort.  I am realizing that it just undermines the process of growth in the person.  Some good thoughts from Irvin Yalom.

Oh the places we go.

Looking to the sky, a shift in perspective.

Looking to the sky, a shift in perspective.

I thought I could. First mountain climb. #stonemountain

I thought I could. First mountain climb. #stonemountain

Exploring the big valley on bike.

Exploring the big valley on bike.

Examples of self care this summer. It started with getting a bike rack which led to a road bike for me. That focused our outings this summer and led to camping and biking. I feel a big difference as the summer as progressed with still a couple of weeks left to explore.

A long time…

So its been a long time since I actually posted something and I think it is time to post again. This summer I’ve been taking advantage of a more relaxed work schedule to re-evaluate my work and re-connect with nature through camping and biking. Several excellent trips with the family have helped me to work through the transition of the past year as I started new jobs and rhythms to life. It has been hard turning 40 and I know that I have made a lot of mistakes this past year. Getting out on the bike trails and spending time in nature is allowing some healing to occur. It has been hard but I am starting to feel like a corner has been turned.

In the last analysis, the Bible is biased; it takes the side of the rejected ones, the abandoned ones, the barren women, and the ones who have been excluded, tortured, and kept outside. This is all summed up in Jesus’ own ministry: He clearly prefers, heals, and includes the foreigner, the non-Jew, the handicapped, and the sinner—without rejecting the people of power, but very clearly critiquing them.

—Richard Rohr

The Bible affirms law, authority, and tradition, as most writings in most of history have done, but then it also does something much more: it strongly affirms reform, change, and the voiceless, starting with the Exodus event itself. This is what makes the Bible a truly revolutionary and inspired book. It affirms the necessity of authority and continuity in a culture (tradition), but against the usual pattern it also affirms the currents of change, reform, the poor, the outsider, and justice for the marginalized groups—starting with the enslaved Jewish people themselves.

—Richard Rohr